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kamagra 100mg review kamagra 100mg review Debate over whether Nevada’s top judges validated the state’s dynasty trusts may seem esoteric but the stakes for planners and jurisdictions jockeying for priority on the high-net-worth map are extremely high. A few weeks ago, noted Las Vegas estate attorney Steve Oshins was crowing that simmering questions surrounding Nevada’s perpetuities statute had been settled. And with two of the biggest players on the national stage – Oshins and the Blattmachr family of Alaska – openly trading shots across the bow, it looks like what was once a dormant controversy is now blazing hotter than ever. The distance between the warring factions adds up to whether a seemingly tangential comment from the Nevada Supreme Court represents an explicit endorsement of the state’s dynasty trust statutes or simply a point of information. Oshins insists that by even mentioning the statutory 365-year trust period, the judges were probably sending a message to out-of-state critics who questioned whether the rule would hold up to a state constitutional ban on perpetuities. The Blattmachrs have fired back that any veiled contextual statement here would be at best tricky to interpret, much less apply in a constitutional challenge. Jonathan Blattmachr, a key architect of Alaska’s trust code, questions whether his “friend Steve Oshins” might be leaping to conclusions, while nephew Matt points out that “the decision does not even appear related to trusts” in an upcoming article on the estate planning ramifications. These are fighting words in the elite estate planning world. With an estimated $100 billion in cross-state trust assets in the balance, there’s good reason for both sides to read so deeply between the lines. Nevada guards its position as one of the most attractive trust jurisdictions in the country extremely jealously. Its closest rivals – Delaware, Alaska, South Dakota – are constantly looking for an opening to take the upper hand. If the state constitution technically overrules more recent statutes that let non-charitable trusts run longer than 90 years, then its prestige fades in the eyes of ultra-high-net-worth families looking for the best place for their money. Once again, the distinctions may appear narrow, but every infinitesimal edge makes a difference as people with enough money to last for more than a few generations weigh the decision of where to park immense sums for centuries. And with that much money on the table, the fine shadings of risk cast a huge shadow. If a trust created in one state has a lower chance of surviving a challenge from creditors, rival heirs or the IRS, the family’s advisors will note it and move on. That’s why the knives are out. Oshins says the latest decision confirms that Nevada dynasty trusts would survive a constitutional challenge. The Blattmachrs say the hypothetical outcome remains in doubt. I’m not going to pick sides and none of the third-party bystanders I talked to were especially eager to do it either. Bob Moshman, a New Jersey attorney and publisher of the Estate Analyst, threads the diplomatic needle. As Moshman points out, the recent outbreak of controversy here derives from an article the Vanderbilt Law Review published last summer from Harvard professor Robert Sitkoff and Chicago lawyer Steven Horowitz. The article questions the idea that any statute in jurisdictions like Nevada – as well as Wyoming, Tennessee, North Carolina and Arizona – explicitly overrides what’s written in each state’s constitution. Moshman calls it “a brilliant 54-page speculation,” but warns that any court that starts to overturn rules that have been on the books for years if not decades starts to look like a “constitutional bogeyman” – especially when there are pragmatic considerations to consider. However the wind blows, rich families are still going to park their money in the states that offer the surest situation and best overall protection in the here and now. Whatever happens, they’re not going to settle for the paltry 90 years that the default trust code provides. They’re going to demand that their trusts be set up in jurisdictions that give the great-grandkids at least a shot at partaking in the family fortune before the IRS gets its cut. “A dynasty trust should be the cornerstone of virtually every wealth transfer plan for families desiring to protect their wealth,” sums up Robert Keebler, an estate planner in Wisconsin. “When designed correctly and sitused in the proper jurisdiction, you obtain protection from both future estate taxes and from the claims of your heirs’ creditors and spouses, “he explains. With that in mind, Keebler’s thoughts turn to figuring out how to best fund a theoretical trust. Picking one state out of several that offer blue-ribbon protection is almost a secondary concern. When we asked Trust Advisor readers to name the best state for trust accounts, we were expecting a tight race between the top-tier jurisdictions. After all, the gap between Nevada, Alaska, South Dakota and Delaware is surprisingly thin from a statutory point of view. But the way the narrowest distinctions are playing out in the court of public opinion is shocking. According to our numbers, Nevada wins by a landslide. When they heard, Las Vegas trust company Premier Trust volunteered to explain why they and their clients are so happy with the state. You can sign up for their September 16 webinar HERE. As always, it’s free and should run about an hour. Nevada ended up with 64% of the response to a very simple question: which trust state is best? Alaska, Delaware and South Dakota –the other names in the traditional bulge bracket – barely scraped up the remaining 36% of the vote between them. We were expecting a much more balanced result, so I suspect trust officers around the nation will be sneaking into the Premier webinar to see what one of the top firms in Nevada considers the reason the state is so dominant in advisor consciousness right now. Maybe it just blows down to marketing and tireless promotion. On a deep level, the playing field is roughly level, so each state should get roughly the same respect from the industry. All four support roughly the same level of protection from creditors, roughly the same favorable tax treatment and support for comparably lengthy “dynastic” trust periods. Nevada often has a tiny edge somewhere, but on the whole it’s too close to really call a winner. But while Nevada may only capture a slight lead before a rival changes its rules to keep up, trust companies that operate there have become very savvy about communicating their edge while they have it. And as we know, the basis of long-term success often boils down to the multiplication of the smallest and most transitory edges from month to month, year to year and decade to decade. Other states may try hard to catch up or challenge whether all wealthy families need or even want every perk in the Nevada trust code, but that’s at best a reactive strategy. Think of how you interact with your prospects. Do you spend more time telling them all the ways you’re great, or do you focus on explaining why they don’t really want what your fiercest competitors are bragging about? Maybe the nation’s richest families really think they might have to lean on all the fine points of Nevada’s asset protection environment in their lifetimes. Or maybe they simply want to know the rules are there to protect future generations from a bad choice of spouses, for example. In any event, it’s a long game that Nevada seems to be winning at the moment. If Nevada’s blowout performance was the biggest surprise in these numbers, the way the other states stacked up behind it was only a little less revealing about how each of them is getting the competitive message out there. Alaska batted far above its weight class. The state has two trust companies on the books and as of three weeks ago, the Alaska Trust team runs them both. Nonetheless, that team has managed on its own to keep Alaska alive as an attractive destination for assets from the Lower 48. Because it’s the only game in Anchorage, Alaska Trust effectively garnered every vote for Alaska, which comes out to 15% of the total. That’s huge. At best, only a few heavyweights in Nevada could even hope to match that performance. Matt Blattmachr, a vice president and trust officer at the firm, was thrilled to hear Alaska ranked No. 2. “We are very excited that Alaska has been chosen as one of the leading jurisdictions by clients throughout the U.S. looking for the most advanced estate planning solutions,” he says. South Dakota, with its dozens of independent trust companies, paradoxically looks a lot less impressive with its 11% of the vote to split so many ways. Over the last few years we’ve seen South Dakota institutions become extremely quiet about the benefits their state provides cross-border accounts. It’s still one of the better trust jurisdictions in the country, but it’s hard to put a finger on when exactly it would be the best choice for a given trust. Arguably a lot of the ways South Dakota excels are behind-the-scenes operational factors. The state obviously shines when it comes to luring trust companies to move their charter or set up shop in its territory. Whether that translates into new accounts remains to be seen. And then there’s Delaware. With just 10% of the vote, the white-glove standard of the traditional trust industry seems a little defensive as non-conventional competitors keep popping up in far-flung states. But let’s be realistic here. Delaware’s trust industry barely bothers to market itself because these firms have sheer gravity on their side. The tiny state has captured close to quadruple its rightful share of the nation’s personal trust assets on a raw state-by-state basis. Per capita, these trust companies are 18 times as successful as their rivals anywhere else. Given the often-tiny distinction between what a trust can get in Delaware and Nevada, gravity and convenience evidently pushes a lot of dollars toward Wilmington. Do the distinctions outweigh inertia where your clients are concerned? The Premier Trust team will provide their view on September 16. Obviously they’re a little biased toward Nevada. That’s why they chose to set up shop in Las Vegas. But if you’d like to hear the secret of their success, you can still register HERE. “I had reached a point where I could not grow anymore,” says Malcolm Liles, whose Nashville-based financial advisory firm currently manages about $600 million in assets and is affiliated with R.W. Baird. Enter Liles’ son, William, a graduate of University of Georgia and Vanderbilt’s MBA program who, in 2010, became his employee and eventual successor. Liles is not unusual.  In a ferociously competitive market, successful advisors are scrambling for young associates who can help them maintain and expand their businesses. Even so, last year, only 32% of financial advisors had a succession plan in place, according to a survey by investment consulting firm SEI. Fewer than half had planned a strategy for attracting younger investors. Those looking to hire younger professionals face daunting odds.  That same SEI survey found that only 3% of advisors are currently under the age of 30. As a result, a small but growing number of advisors are finding that the search for talent begins at home. For instance, Matt Blattmachr worked for his father Doug’s company, Alaska Trust, summers and part-time all through college and high school. When the firm’s three-person operations team left, Matt took over and streamlined the company’s back office. His father says he made it work better than it ever had before. Still, joining his dad’s firm was never a foregone conclusion. When Matt graduated from the University of Alaska with a degree in logistics, he got an attractive offer from BP in Anchorage. About to lose one of his star employees, Doug Blattmachr went to his board. Brandon Crooks also had other options than working at his father’s company, Counsel Trust in York, Pennsylvania. After majoring in finance, Brandon went to work for Bank of America Securities. He was an investment banker working in the mortgage-backed securities business. As the mortgage market soured and Brandon was moved into the corporate side of the bank, however, he began to talk to his dad about joining him. “I think in the back of my mind, I always wanted to do that,” says Brandon. All three of the dads we talked to said that they would have hired their sons even if they hadn’t been related. The first hurdle, then, is making sure that your son or daughter is qualified. “You have to look and see whether your child is really capable of doing the work, and is he doing the work?” says Doug Blattmachr. “One of the reasons that our business relationship works is that I was qualified for the business,” says William Liles. The father-son pairs we spoke to started talking about the business at an early age, around the dinner table and after school. That easy give-and-take pays dividends when the son comes to work for the father. “We communicate with each other all day every day,” says Malcolm Liles. Different family businesses have different structures. Malcolm Liles describes himself as a ”benevolent dictator” with ultimate say over business decisions. Edward and Brandon Crooks make decisions together, along with two others on their executive committee. Whatever the management style, fathers need to make sure their children are comfortable with it before joining the business. Sons at all three companies bring their own strengths to the partnership. Matt Blattmachr understands the operations side of Alaska Trust better than anyone else. William Liles has a strong analytical bent, which he brings to bear on researching stocks, bonds, funds and wealth planning strategies. And Brandon Crooks has taken the lead on developing a directed trust business at his father’s company. Their fathers have made an effort to recognize and put their sons’ abilities to work, allowing them the flexibility to find their own particular niches within the overall company. Yet while sons and daughters may specialize, they also need to gain an overall understanding of the business so that they can take over one day. None of the fathers we spoke to were ready to retire yet, but all three had started thinking about the skills their children would need to succeed them. “I wanted to make sure that there wasn’t chaos in the event of my death or disability,” says Edward Crooks. For Malcolm Liles, the goal was to make William and himself interchangeable to clients. “I want my clients to understand that if they call and I’m out, that he can handle it,” he says. This final element of family and business succession is, perhaps, the most difficult one, and one that none of the three fathers we talked to were ready for quite yet. Still, at some point, the older generation will have to step aside, however gradually, to make way for the next one. “At my age — I’m 63 — I’m not really looking at it as a transition,” says Edward Crooks. Alaska Trust says frugal fees are better for both clients and advisors alike. New low fixed fees and advisor controlled directed trust program makes Alaska Trust a top choice for trust services. Best known as a provider of full-service managed trusts at made-to-measure prices, Alaska Trust has started turning heads for offering its directed trusts at a flat fee. Critical mass pushes outsourced approaches into the industry mainstream and big players keep lining up. The future is here, grab while you can. We’re coming up on the seventh anniversary of the Lehman Brothers crash and I can’t help but notice that the post-traumatic wounds have finally healed. Displacing $11 billion in assets creates a teachable moment for the entire industry. Creating a recovery that turns a disruptive surprise into a transformative opportunity. Life insurance is one of the least understood financial products in the world. In just a few minutes of study, one can reasonably grasp the concept of equity interests in a business , bonds and other forms of debt. Even more complicated financial products, such as derivatives and options can be readily understood. Shifting from accumulation to the distribution phase can dramatically simplify your clients’ lives. With the right technology, it can have a similar effect on an evolving wealth management operation. A few days ago the IRS quietly folded a long-standing claim that Detroit industrialist and basketball fan Bill Davidson’s heirs owed $2.9 billion on a fortune that might have been worth $3.5 billion at its peak.








kamagra 100mg review And Medical History:Debate over whether Nevada’s top judges validated the state’s dynasty trusts may seem esoteric but the stakes for planners and jurisdictions jockeying for priority on the high-net-worth map are extremely high. A few weeks ago, noted Las Vegas estate attorney Steve Oshins was crowing that simmering questions surrounding Nevada’s perpetuities statute had been settled. And with two of the biggest players on the national stage – Oshins and the Blattmachr family of Alaska – openly trading shots across the bow, it looks like what was once a dormant controversy is now blazing hotter than ever. The distance between the warring factions adds up to whether a seemingly tangential comment from the Nevada Supreme Court represents an explicit endorsement of the state’s dynasty trust statutes or simply a point of information. Oshins insists that by even mentioning the statutory 365-year trust period, the judges were probably sending a message to out-of-state critics who questioned whether the rule would hold up to a state constitutional ban on perpetuities. The Blattmachrs have fired back that any veiled contextual statement here would be at best tricky to interpret, much less apply in a constitutional challenge. Jonathan Blattmachr, a key architect of Alaska’s trust code, questions whether his “friend Steve Oshins” might be leaping to conclusions, while nephew Matt points out that “the decision does not even appear related to trusts” in an upcoming article on the estate planning ramifications. These are fighting words in the elite estate planning world. With an estimated $100 billion in cross-state trust assets in the balance, there’s good reason for both sides to read so deeply between the lines. Nevada guards its position as one of the most attractive trust jurisdictions in the country extremely jealously. Its closest rivals – Delaware, Alaska, South Dakota – are constantly looking for an opening to take the upper hand. If the state constitution technically overrules more recent statutes that let non-charitable trusts run longer than 90 years, then its prestige fades in the eyes of ultra-high-net-worth families looking for the best place for their money. Once again, the distinctions may appear narrow, but every infinitesimal edge makes a difference as people with enough money to last for more than a few generations weigh the decision of where to park immense sums for centuries. And with that much money on the table, the fine shadings of risk cast a huge shadow. If a trust created in one state has a lower chance of surviving a challenge from creditors, rival heirs or the IRS, the family’s advisors will note it and move on. That’s why the knives are out. Oshins says the latest decision confirms that Nevada dynasty trusts would survive a constitutional challenge. The Blattmachrs say the hypothetical outcome remains in doubt. I’m not going to pick sides and none of the third-party bystanders I talked to were especially eager to do it either. Bob Moshman, a New Jersey attorney and publisher of the Estate Analyst, threads the diplomatic needle. As Moshman points out, the recent outbreak of controversy here derives from an article the Vanderbilt Law Review published last summer from Harvard professor Robert Sitkoff and Chicago lawyer Steven Horowitz. The article questions the idea that any statute in jurisdictions like Nevada – as well as Wyoming, Tennessee, North Carolina and Arizona – explicitly overrides what’s written in each state’s constitution. Moshman calls it “a brilliant 54-page speculation,” but warns that any court that starts to overturn rules that have been on the books for years if not decades starts to look like a “constitutional bogeyman” – especially when there are pragmatic considerations to consider. However the wind blows, rich families are still going to park their money in the states that offer the surest situation and best overall protection in the here and now. Whatever happens, they’re not going to settle for the paltry 90 years that the default trust code provides. They’re going to demand that their trusts be set up in jurisdictions that give the great-grandkids at least a shot at partaking in the family fortune before the IRS gets its cut. “A dynasty trust should be the cornerstone of virtually every wealth transfer plan for families desiring to protect their wealth,” sums up Robert Keebler, an estate planner in Wisconsin. “When designed correctly and sitused in the proper jurisdiction, you obtain protection from both future estate taxes and from the claims of your heirs’ creditors and spouses, “he explains. With that in mind, Keebler’s thoughts turn to figuring out how to best fund a theoretical trust. Picking one state out of several that offer blue-ribbon protection is almost a secondary concern. When we asked Trust Advisor readers to name the best state for trust accounts, we were expecting a tight race between the top-tier jurisdictions. After all, the gap between Nevada, Alaska, South Dakota and Delaware is surprisingly thin from a statutory point of view. But the way the narrowest distinctions are playing out in the court of public opinion is shocking. According to our numbers, Nevada wins by a landslide. When they heard, Las Vegas trust company Premier Trust volunteered to explain why they and their clients are so happy with the state. You can sign up for their September 16 webinar HERE. As always, it’s free and should run about an hour. Nevada ended up with 64% of the response to a very simple question: which trust state is best? Alaska, Delaware and South Dakota –the other names in the traditional bulge bracket – barely scraped up the remaining 36% of the vote between them. We were expecting a much more balanced result, so I suspect trust officers around the nation will be sneaking into the Premier webinar to see what one of the top firms in Nevada considers the reason the state is so dominant in advisor consciousness right now. Maybe it just blows down to marketing and tireless promotion. On a deep level, the playing field is roughly level, so each state should get roughly the same respect from the industry. All four support roughly the same level of protection from creditors, roughly the same favorable tax treatment and support for comparably lengthy “dynastic” trust periods. Nevada often has a tiny edge somewhere, but on the whole it’s too close to really call a winner. But while Nevada may only capture a slight lead before a rival changes its rules to keep up, trust companies that operate there have become very savvy about communicating their edge while they have it. And as we know, the basis of long-term success often boils down to the multiplication of the smallest and most transitory edges from month to month, year to year and decade to decade. Other states may try hard to catch up or challenge whether all wealthy families need or even want every perk in the Nevada trust code, but that’s at best a reactive strategy. Think of how you interact with your prospects. Do you spend more time telling them all the ways you’re great, or do you focus on explaining why they don’t really want what your fiercest competitors are bragging about? Maybe the nation’s richest families really think they might have to lean on all the fine points of Nevada’s asset protection environment in their lifetimes. Or maybe they simply want to know the rules are there to protect future generations from a bad choice of spouses, for example. In any event, it’s a long game that Nevada seems to be winning at the moment. If Nevada’s blowout performance was the biggest surprise in these numbers, the way the other states stacked up behind it was only a little less revealing about how each of them is getting the competitive message out there. Alaska batted far above its weight class. The state has two trust companies on the books and as of three weeks ago, the Alaska Trust team runs them both. Nonetheless, that team has managed on its own to keep Alaska alive as an attractive destination for assets from the Lower 48. Because it’s the only game in Anchorage, Alaska Trust effectively garnered every vote for Alaska, which comes out to 15% of the total. That’s huge. At best, only a few heavyweights in Nevada could even hope to match that performance. Matt Blattmachr, a vice president and trust officer at the firm, was thrilled to hear Alaska ranked No. 2. “We are very excited that Alaska has been chosen as one of the leading jurisdictions by clients throughout the U.S. looking for the most advanced estate planning solutions,” he says. South Dakota, with its dozens of independent trust companies, paradoxically looks a lot less impressive with its 11% of the vote to split so many ways. Over the last few years we’ve seen South Dakota institutions become extremely quiet about the benefits their state provides cross-border accounts. It’s still one of the better trust jurisdictions in the country, but it’s hard to put a finger on when exactly it would be the best choice for a given trust. Arguably a lot of the ways South Dakota excels are behind-the-scenes operational factors. The state obviously shines when it comes to luring trust companies to move their charter or set up shop in its territory. Whether that translates into new accounts remains to be seen. And then there’s Delaware. With just 10% of the vote, the white-glove standard of the traditional trust industry seems a little defensive as non-conventional competitors keep popping up in far-flung states. But let’s be realistic here. Delaware’s trust industry barely bothers to market itself because these firms have sheer gravity on their side. The tiny state has captured close to quadruple its rightful share of the nation’s personal trust assets on a raw state-by-state basis. Per capita, these trust companies are 18 times as successful as their rivals anywhere else. Given the often-tiny distinction between what a trust can get in Delaware and Nevada, gravity and convenience evidently pushes a lot of dollars toward Wilmington. Do the distinctions outweigh inertia where your clients are concerned? The Premier Trust team will provide their view on September 16. Obviously they’re a little biased toward Nevada. That’s why they chose to set up shop in Las Vegas. But if you’d like to hear the secret of their success, you can still register HERE. “I had reached a point where I could not grow anymore,” says Malcolm Liles, whose Nashville-based financial advisory firm currently manages about $600 million in assets and is affiliated with R.W. Baird. Enter Liles’ son, William, a graduate of University of Georgia and Vanderbilt’s MBA program who, in 2010, became his employee and eventual successor. Liles is not unusual.  In a ferociously competitive market, successful advisors are scrambling for young associates who can help them maintain and expand their businesses. Even so, last year, only 32% of financial advisors had a succession plan in place, according to a survey by investment consulting firm SEI. Fewer than half had planned a strategy for attracting younger investors. Those looking to hire younger professionals face daunting odds.  That same SEI survey found that only 3% of advisors are currently under the age of 30. As a result, a small but growing number of advisors are finding that the search for talent begins at home. For instance, Matt Blattmachr worked for his father Doug’s company, Alaska Trust, summers and part-time all through college and high school. When the firm’s three-person operations team left, Matt took over and streamlined the company’s back office. His father says he made it work better than it ever had before. Still, joining his dad’s firm was never a foregone conclusion. When Matt graduated from the University of Alaska with a degree in logistics, he got an attractive offer from BP in Anchorage. About to lose one of his star employees, Doug Blattmachr went to his board. Brandon Crooks also had other options than working at his father’s company, Counsel Trust in York, Pennsylvania. After majoring in finance, Brandon went to work for Bank of America Securities. He was an investment banker working in the mortgage-backed securities business. As the mortgage market soured and Brandon was moved into the corporate side of the bank, however, he began to talk to his dad about joining him. “I think in the back of my mind, I always wanted to do that,” says Brandon. All three of the dads we talked to said that they would have hired their sons even if they hadn’t been related. The first hurdle, then, is making sure that your son or daughter is qualified. “You have to look and see whether your child is really capable of doing the work, and is he doing the work?” says Doug Blattmachr. “One of the reasons that our business relationship works is that I was qualified for the business,” says William Liles. The father-son pairs we spoke to started talking about the business at an early age, around the dinner table and after school. That easy give-and-take pays dividends when the son comes to work for the father. “We communicate with each other all day every day,” says Malcolm Liles. Different family businesses have different structures. Malcolm Liles describes himself as a ”benevolent dictator” with ultimate say over business decisions. Edward and Brandon Crooks make decisions together, along with two others on their executive committee. Whatever the management style, fathers need to make sure their children are comfortable with it before joining the business. Sons at all three companies bring their own strengths to the partnership. Matt Blattmachr understands the operations side of Alaska Trust better than anyone else. William Liles has a strong analytical bent, which he brings to bear on researching stocks, bonds, funds and wealth planning strategies. And Brandon Crooks has taken the lead on developing a directed trust business at his father’s company. Their fathers have made an effort to recognize and put their sons’ abilities to work, allowing them the flexibility to find their own particular niches within the overall company. Yet while sons and daughters may specialize, they also need to gain an overall understanding of the business so that they can take over one day. None of the fathers we spoke to were ready to retire yet, but all three had started thinking about the skills their children would need to succeed them. “I wanted to make sure that there wasn’t chaos in the event of my death or disability,” says Edward Crooks. For Malcolm Liles, the goal was to make William and himself interchangeable to clients. “I want my clients to understand that if they call and I’m out, that he can handle it,” he says. This final element of family and business succession is, perhaps, the most difficult one, and one that none of the three fathers we talked to were ready for quite yet. Still, at some point, the older generation will have to step aside, however gradually, to make way for the next one. “At my age — I’m 63 — I’m not really looking at it as a transition,” says Edward Crooks. Alaska Trust says frugal fees are better for both clients and advisors alike. New low fixed fees and advisor controlled directed trust program makes Alaska Trust a top choice for trust services. Best known as a provider of full-service managed trusts at made-to-measure prices, Alaska Trust has started turning heads for offering its directed trusts at a flat fee. Critical mass pushes outsourced approaches into the industry mainstream and big players keep lining up. The future is here, grab while you can. We’re coming up on the seventh anniversary of the Lehman Brothers crash and I can’t help but notice that the post-traumatic wounds have finally healed. Displacing $11 billion in assets creates a teachable moment for the entire industry. Creating a recovery that turns a disruptive surprise into a transformative opportunity. Life insurance is one of the least understood financial products in the world. In just a few minutes of study, one can reasonably grasp the concept of equity interests in a business , bonds and other forms of debt. Even more complicated financial products, such as derivatives and options can be readily understood. Shifting from accumulation to the distribution phase can dramatically simplify your clients’ lives. With the right technology, it can have a similar effect on an evolving wealth management operation. A few days ago the IRS quietly folded a long-standing claim that Detroit industrialist and basketball fan Bill Davidson’s heirs owed $2.9 billion on a fortune that might have been worth $3.5 billion at its peak. The medical history of the patient is very important before kamagra 100mg review treatment can begin. 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Debate over whether Nevada’s top judges validated the state’s dynasty trusts may seem esoteric but the stakes for planners and jurisdictions jockeying for priority on the high-net-worth map are extremely high. A few weeks ago, noted Las Vegas estate attorney Steve Oshins was crowing that simmering questions surrounding Nevada’s perpetuities statute had been settled. And with two of the biggest players on the national stage – Oshins and the Blattmachr family of Alaska – openly trading shots across the bow, it looks like what was once a dormant controversy is now blazing hotter than ever. The distance between the warring factions adds up to whether a seemingly tangential comment from the Nevada Supreme Court represents an explicit endorsement of the state’s dynasty trust statutes or simply a point of information. Oshins insists that by even mentioning the statutory 365-year trust period, the judges were probably sending a message to out-of-state critics who questioned whether the rule would hold up to a state constitutional ban on perpetuities. The Blattmachrs have fired back that any veiled contextual statement here would be at best tricky to interpret, much less apply in a constitutional challenge. Jonathan Blattmachr, a key architect of Alaska’s trust code, questions whether his “friend Steve Oshins” might be leaping to conclusions, while nephew Matt points out that “the decision does not even appear related to trusts” in an upcoming article on the estate planning ramifications. These are fighting words in the elite estate planning world. With an estimated $100 billion in cross-state trust assets in the balance, there’s good reason for both sides to read so deeply between the lines. Nevada guards its position as one of the most attractive trust jurisdictions in the country extremely jealously. Its closest rivals – Delaware, Alaska, South Dakota – are constantly looking for an opening to take the upper hand. If the state constitution technically overrules more recent statutes that let non-charitable trusts run longer than 90 years, then its prestige fades in the eyes of ultra-high-net-worth families looking for the best place for their money. Once again, the distinctions may appear narrow, but every infinitesimal edge makes a difference as people with enough money to last for more than a few generations weigh the decision of where to park immense sums for centuries. And with that much money on the table, the fine shadings of risk cast a huge shadow. If a trust created in one state has a lower chance of surviving a challenge from creditors, rival heirs or the IRS, the family’s advisors will note it and move on. That’s why the knives are out. Oshins says the latest decision confirms that Nevada dynasty trusts would survive a constitutional challenge. The Blattmachrs say the hypothetical outcome remains in doubt. I’m not going to pick sides and none of the third-party bystanders I talked to were especially eager to do it either. Bob Moshman, a New Jersey attorney and publisher of the Estate Analyst, threads the diplomatic needle. As Moshman points out, the recent outbreak of controversy here derives from an article the Vanderbilt Law Review published last summer from Harvard professor Robert Sitkoff and Chicago lawyer Steven Horowitz. The article questions the idea that any statute in jurisdictions like Nevada – as well as Wyoming, Tennessee, North Carolina and Arizona – explicitly overrides what’s written in each state’s constitution. Moshman calls it “a brilliant 54-page speculation,” but warns that any court that starts to overturn rules that have been on the books for years if not decades starts to look like a “constitutional bogeyman” – especially when there are pragmatic considerations to consider. However the wind blows, rich families are still going to park their money in the states that offer the surest situation and best overall protection in the here and now. Whatever happens, they’re not going to settle for the paltry 90 years that the default trust code provides. They’re going to demand that their trusts be set up in jurisdictions that give the great-grandkids at least a shot at partaking in the family fortune before the IRS gets its cut. “A dynasty trust should be the cornerstone of virtually every wealth transfer plan for families desiring to protect their wealth,” sums up Robert Keebler, an estate planner in Wisconsin. “When designed correctly and sitused in the proper jurisdiction, you obtain protection from both future estate taxes and from the claims of your heirs’ creditors and spouses, “he explains. With that in mind, Keebler’s thoughts turn to figuring out how to best fund a theoretical trust. Picking one state out of several that offer blue-ribbon protection is almost a secondary concern. When we asked Trust Advisor readers to name the best state for trust accounts, we were expecting a tight race between the top-tier jurisdictions. After all, the gap between Nevada, Alaska, South Dakota and Delaware is surprisingly thin from a statutory point of view. But the way the narrowest distinctions are playing out in the court of public opinion is shocking. According to our numbers, Nevada wins by a landslide. When they heard, Las Vegas trust company Premier Trust volunteered to explain why they and their clients are so happy with the state. You can sign up for their September 16 webinar HERE. As always, it’s free and should run about an hour. Nevada ended up with 64% of the response to a very simple question: which trust state is best? Alaska, Delaware and South Dakota –the other names in the traditional bulge bracket – barely scraped up the remaining 36% of the vote between them. We were expecting a much more balanced result, so I suspect trust officers around the nation will be sneaking into the Premier webinar to see what one of the top firms in Nevada considers the reason the state is so dominant in advisor consciousness right now. Maybe it just blows down to marketing and tireless promotion. On a deep level, the playing field is roughly level, so each state should get roughly the same respect from the industry. All four support roughly the same level of protection from creditors, roughly the same favorable tax treatment and support for comparably lengthy “dynastic” trust periods. Nevada often has a tiny edge somewhere, but on the whole it’s too close to really call a winner. But while Nevada may only capture a slight lead before a rival changes its rules to keep up, trust companies that operate there have become very savvy about communicating their edge while they have it. And as we know, the basis of long-term success often boils down to the multiplication of the smallest and most transitory edges from month to month, year to year and decade to decade. Other states may try hard to catch up or challenge whether all wealthy families need or even want every perk in the Nevada trust code, but that’s at best a reactive strategy. Think of how you interact with your prospects. Do you spend more time telling them all the ways you’re great, or do you focus on explaining why they don’t really want what your fiercest competitors are bragging about? Maybe the nation’s richest families really think they might have to lean on all the fine points of Nevada’s asset protection environment in their lifetimes. Or maybe they simply want to know the rules are there to protect future generations from a bad choice of spouses, for example. In any event, it’s a long game that Nevada seems to be winning at the moment. If Nevada’s blowout performance was the biggest surprise in these numbers, the way the other states stacked up behind it was only a little less revealing about how each of them is getting the competitive message out there. Alaska batted far above its weight class. The state has two trust companies on the books and as of three weeks ago, the Alaska Trust team runs them both. Nonetheless, that team has managed on its own to keep Alaska alive as an attractive destination for assets from the Lower 48. Because it’s the only game in Anchorage, Alaska Trust effectively garnered every vote for Alaska, which comes out to 15% of the total. That’s huge. At best, only a few heavyweights in Nevada could even hope to match that performance. Matt Blattmachr, a vice president and trust officer at the firm, was thrilled to hear Alaska ranked No. 2. “We are very excited that Alaska has been chosen as one of the leading jurisdictions by clients throughout the U.S. looking for the most advanced estate planning solutions,” he says. South Dakota, with its dozens of independent trust companies, paradoxically looks a lot less impressive with its 11% of the vote to split so many ways. Over the last few years we’ve seen South Dakota institutions become extremely quiet about the benefits their state provides cross-border accounts. It’s still one of the better trust jurisdictions in the country, but it’s hard to put a finger on when exactly it would be the best choice for a given trust. Arguably a lot of the ways South Dakota excels are behind-the-scenes operational factors. The state obviously shines when it comes to luring trust companies to move their charter or set up shop in its territory. Whether that translates into new accounts remains to be seen. And then there’s Delaware. With just 10% of the vote, the white-glove standard of the traditional trust industry seems a little defensive as non-conventional competitors keep popping up in far-flung states. But let’s be realistic here. Delaware’s trust industry barely bothers to market itself because these firms have sheer gravity on their side. The tiny state has captured close to quadruple its rightful share of the nation’s personal trust assets on a raw state-by-state basis. Per capita, these trust companies are 18 times as successful as their rivals anywhere else. Given the often-tiny distinction between what a trust can get in Delaware and Nevada, gravity and convenience evidently pushes a lot of dollars toward Wilmington. Do the distinctions outweigh inertia where your clients are concerned? The Premier Trust team will provide their view on September 16. Obviously they’re a little biased toward Nevada. That’s why they chose to set up shop in Las Vegas. But if you’d like to hear the secret of their success, you can still register HERE. “I had reached a point where I could not grow anymore,” says Malcolm Liles, whose Nashville-based financial advisory firm currently manages about $600 million in assets and is affiliated with R.W. Baird. Enter Liles’ son, William, a graduate of University of Georgia and Vanderbilt’s MBA program who, in 2010, became his employee and eventual successor. Liles is not unusual.  In a ferociously competitive market, successful advisors are scrambling for young associates who can help them maintain and expand their businesses. Even so, last year, only 32% of financial advisors had a succession plan in place, according to a survey by investment consulting firm SEI. Fewer than half had planned a strategy for attracting younger investors. Those looking to hire younger professionals face daunting odds.  That same SEI survey found that only 3% of advisors are currently under the age of 30. As a result, a small but growing number of advisors are finding that the search for talent begins at home. For instance, Matt Blattmachr worked for his father Doug’s company, Alaska Trust, summers and part-time all through college and high school. When the firm’s three-person operations team left, Matt took over and streamlined the company’s back office. His father says he made it work better than it ever had before. Still, joining his dad’s firm was never a foregone conclusion. When Matt graduated from the University of Alaska with a degree in logistics, he got an attractive offer from BP in Anchorage. About to lose one of his star employees, Doug Blattmachr went to his board. Brandon Crooks also had other options than working at his father’s company, Counsel Trust in York, Pennsylvania. After majoring in finance, Brandon went to work for Bank of America Securities. He was an investment banker working in the mortgage-backed securities business. As the mortgage market soured and Brandon was moved into the corporate side of the bank, however, he began to talk to his dad about joining him. “I think in the back of my mind, I always wanted to do that,” says Brandon. All three of the dads we talked to said that they would have hired their sons even if they hadn’t been related. The first hurdle, then, is making sure that your son or daughter is qualified. “You have to look and see whether your child is really capable of doing the work, and is he doing the work?” says Doug Blattmachr. “One of the reasons that our business relationship works is that I was qualified for the business,” says William Liles. The father-son pairs we spoke to started talking about the business at an early age, around the dinner table and after school. That easy give-and-take pays dividends when the son comes to work for the father. “We communicate with each other all day every day,” says Malcolm Liles. Different family businesses have different structures. Malcolm Liles describes himself as a ”benevolent dictator” with ultimate say over business decisions. Edward and Brandon Crooks make decisions together, along with two others on their executive committee. Whatever the management style, fathers need to make sure their children are comfortable with it before joining the business. Sons at all three companies bring their own strengths to the partnership. Matt Blattmachr understands the operations side of Alaska Trust better than anyone else. William Liles has a strong analytical bent, which he brings to bear on researching stocks, bonds, funds and wealth planning strategies. And Brandon Crooks has taken the lead on developing a directed trust business at his father’s company. Their fathers have made an effort to recognize and put their sons’ abilities to work, allowing them the flexibility to find their own particular niches within the overall company. Yet while sons and daughters may specialize, they also need to gain an overall understanding of the business so that they can take over one day. None of the fathers we spoke to were ready to retire yet, but all three had started thinking about the skills their children would need to succeed them. “I wanted to make sure that there wasn’t chaos in the event of my death or disability,” says Edward Crooks. For Malcolm Liles, the goal was to make William and himself interchangeable to clients. “I want my clients to understand that if they call and I’m out, that he can handle it,” he says. This final element of family and business succession is, perhaps, the most difficult one, and one that none of the three fathers we talked to were ready for quite yet. Still, at some point, the older generation will have to step aside, however gradually, to make way for the next one. “At my age — I’m 63 — I’m not really looking at it as a transition,” says Edward Crooks. Alaska Trust says frugal fees are better for both clients and advisors alike. New low fixed fees and advisor controlled directed trust program makes Alaska Trust a top choice for trust services. Best known as a provider of full-service managed trusts at made-to-measure prices, Alaska Trust has started turning heads for offering its directed trusts at a flat fee. Critical mass pushes outsourced approaches into the industry mainstream and big players keep lining up. The future is here, grab while you can. We’re coming up on the seventh anniversary of the Lehman Brothers crash and I can’t help but notice that the post-traumatic wounds have finally healed. Displacing $11 billion in assets creates a teachable moment for the entire industry. Creating a recovery that turns a disruptive surprise into a transformative opportunity. Life insurance is one of the least understood financial products in the world. In just a few minutes of study, one can reasonably grasp the concept of equity interests in a business , bonds and other forms of debt. Even more complicated financial products, such as derivatives and options can be readily understood. Shifting from accumulation to the distribution phase can dramatically simplify your clients’ lives. With the right technology, it can have a similar effect on an evolving wealth management operation. 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Debate over whether Nevada’s top judges validated the state’s dynasty trusts may seem esoteric but the stakes for planners and jurisdictions jockeying for priority on the high-net-worth map are extremely high. A few weeks ago, noted Las Vegas estate attorney Steve Oshins was crowing that simmering questions surrounding Nevada’s perpetuities statute had been settled. And with two of the biggest players on the national stage – Oshins and the Blattmachr family of Alaska – openly trading shots across the bow, it looks like what was once a dormant controversy is now blazing hotter than ever. The distance between the warring factions adds up to whether a seemingly tangential comment from the Nevada Supreme Court represents an explicit endorsement of the state’s dynasty trust statutes or simply a point of information. Oshins insists that by even mentioning the statutory 365-year trust period, the judges were probably sending a message to out-of-state critics who questioned whether the rule would hold up to a state constitutional ban on perpetuities. The Blattmachrs have fired back that any veiled contextual statement here would be at best tricky to interpret, much less apply in a constitutional challenge. Jonathan Blattmachr, a key architect of Alaska’s trust code, questions whether his “friend Steve Oshins” might be leaping to conclusions, while nephew Matt points out that “the decision does not even appear related to trusts” in an upcoming article on the estate planning ramifications. These are fighting words in the elite estate planning world. With an estimated $100 billion in cross-state trust assets in the balance, there’s good reason for both sides to read so deeply between the lines. Nevada guards its position as one of the most attractive trust jurisdictions in the country extremely jealously. Its closest rivals – Delaware, Alaska, South Dakota – are constantly looking for an opening to take the upper hand. If the state constitution technically overrules more recent statutes that let non-charitable trusts run longer than 90 years, then its prestige fades in the eyes of ultra-high-net-worth families looking for the best place for their money. Once again, the distinctions may appear narrow, but every infinitesimal edge makes a difference as people with enough money to last for more than a few generations weigh the decision of where to park immense sums for centuries. And with that much money on the table, the fine shadings of risk cast a huge shadow. If a trust created in one state has a lower chance of surviving a challenge from creditors, rival heirs or the IRS, the family’s advisors will note it and move on. That’s why the knives are out. Oshins says the latest decision confirms that Nevada dynasty trusts would survive a constitutional challenge. The Blattmachrs say the hypothetical outcome remains in doubt. I’m not going to pick sides and none of the third-party bystanders I talked to were especially eager to do it either. Bob Moshman, a New Jersey attorney and publisher of the Estate Analyst, threads the diplomatic needle. As Moshman points out, the recent outbreak of controversy here derives from an article the Vanderbilt Law Review published last summer from Harvard professor Robert Sitkoff and Chicago lawyer Steven Horowitz. The article questions the idea that any statute in jurisdictions like Nevada – as well as Wyoming, Tennessee, North Carolina and Arizona – explicitly overrides what’s written in each state’s constitution. Moshman calls it “a brilliant 54-page speculation,” but warns that any court that starts to overturn rules that have been on the books for years if not decades starts to look like a “constitutional bogeyman” – especially when there are pragmatic considerations to consider. However the wind blows, rich families are still going to park their money in the states that offer the surest situation and best overall protection in the here and now. Whatever happens, they’re not going to settle for the paltry 90 years that the default trust code provides. They’re going to demand that their trusts be set up in jurisdictions that give the great-grandkids at least a shot at partaking in the family fortune before the IRS gets its cut. “A dynasty trust should be the cornerstone of virtually every wealth transfer plan for families desiring to protect their wealth,” sums up Robert Keebler, an estate planner in Wisconsin. “When designed correctly and sitused in the proper jurisdiction, you obtain protection from both future estate taxes and from the claims of your heirs’ creditors and spouses, “he explains. With that in mind, Keebler’s thoughts turn to figuring out how to best fund a theoretical trust. Picking one state out of several that offer blue-ribbon protection is almost a secondary concern. When we asked Trust Advisor readers to name the best state for trust accounts, we were expecting a tight race between the top-tier jurisdictions. After all, the gap between Nevada, Alaska, South Dakota and Delaware is surprisingly thin from a statutory point of view. But the way the narrowest distinctions are playing out in the court of public opinion is shocking. According to our numbers, Nevada wins by a landslide. When they heard, Las Vegas trust company Premier Trust volunteered to explain why they and their clients are so happy with the state. You can sign up for their September 16 webinar HERE. As always, it’s free and should run about an hour. Nevada ended up with 64% of the response to a very simple question: which trust state is best? Alaska, Delaware and South Dakota –the other names in the traditional bulge bracket – barely scraped up the remaining 36% of the vote between them. We were expecting a much more balanced result, so I suspect trust officers around the nation will be sneaking into the Premier webinar to see what one of the top firms in Nevada considers the reason the state is so dominant in advisor consciousness right now. Maybe it just blows down to marketing and tireless promotion. On a deep level, the playing field is roughly level, so each state should get roughly the same respect from the industry. All four support roughly the same level of protection from creditors, roughly the same favorable tax treatment and support for comparably lengthy “dynastic” trust periods. Nevada often has a tiny edge somewhere, but on the whole it’s too close to really call a winner. But while Nevada may only capture a slight lead before a rival changes its rules to keep up, trust companies that operate there have become very savvy about communicating their edge while they have it. And as we know, the basis of long-term success often boils down to the multiplication of the smallest and most transitory edges from month to month, year to year and decade to decade. Other states may try hard to catch up or challenge whether all wealthy families need or even want every perk in the Nevada trust code, but that’s at best a reactive strategy. Think of how you interact with your prospects. Do you spend more time telling them all the ways you’re great, or do you focus on explaining why they don’t really want what your fiercest competitors are bragging about? Maybe the nation’s richest families really think they might have to lean on all the fine points of Nevada’s asset protection environment in their lifetimes. Or maybe they simply want to know the rules are there to protect future generations from a bad choice of spouses, for example. In any event, it’s a long game that Nevada seems to be winning at the moment. If Nevada’s blowout performance was the biggest surprise in these numbers, the way the other states stacked up behind it was only a little less revealing about how each of them is getting the competitive message out there. Alaska batted far above its weight class. The state has two trust companies on the books and as of three weeks ago, the Alaska Trust team runs them both. Nonetheless, that team has managed on its own to keep Alaska alive as an attractive destination for assets from the Lower 48. Because it’s the only game in Anchorage, Alaska Trust effectively garnered every vote for Alaska, which comes out to 15% of the total. That’s huge. At best, only a few heavyweights in Nevada could even hope to match that performance. Matt Blattmachr, a vice president and trust officer at the firm, was thrilled to hear Alaska ranked No. 2. “We are very excited that Alaska has been chosen as one of the leading jurisdictions by clients throughout the U.S. looking for the most advanced estate planning solutions,” he says. South Dakota, with its dozens of independent trust companies, paradoxically looks a lot less impressive with its 11% of the vote to split so many ways. Over the last few years we’ve seen South Dakota institutions become extremely quiet about the benefits their state provides cross-border accounts. It’s still one of the better trust jurisdictions in the country, but it’s hard to put a finger on when exactly it would be the best choice for a given trust. Arguably a lot of the ways South Dakota excels are behind-the-scenes operational factors. The state obviously shines when it comes to luring trust companies to move their charter or set up shop in its territory. Whether that translates into new accounts remains to be seen. And then there’s Delaware. With just 10% of the vote, the white-glove standard of the traditional trust industry seems a little defensive as non-conventional competitors keep popping up in far-flung states. But let’s be realistic here. Delaware’s trust industry barely bothers to market itself because these firms have sheer gravity on their side. The tiny state has captured close to quadruple its rightful share of the nation’s personal trust assets on a raw state-by-state basis. Per capita, these trust companies are 18 times as successful as their rivals anywhere else. Given the often-tiny distinction between what a trust can get in Delaware and Nevada, gravity and convenience evidently pushes a lot of dollars toward Wilmington. Do the distinctions outweigh inertia where your clients are concerned? The Premier Trust team will provide their view on September 16. Obviously they’re a little biased toward Nevada. That’s why they chose to set up shop in Las Vegas. But if you’d like to hear the secret of their success, you can still register HERE. “I had reached a point where I could not grow anymore,” says Malcolm Liles, whose Nashville-based financial advisory firm currently manages about $600 million in assets and is affiliated with R.W. Baird. Enter Liles’ son, William, a graduate of University of Georgia and Vanderbilt’s MBA program who, in 2010, became his employee and eventual successor. Liles is not unusual.  In a ferociously competitive market, successful advisors are scrambling for young associates who can help them maintain and expand their businesses. Even so, last year, only 32% of financial advisors had a succession plan in place, according to a survey by investment consulting firm SEI. Fewer than half had planned a strategy for attracting younger investors. Those looking to hire younger professionals face daunting odds.  That same SEI survey found that only 3% of advisors are currently under the age of 30. As a result, a small but growing number of advisors are finding that the search for talent begins at home. For instance, Matt Blattmachr worked for his father Doug’s company, Alaska Trust, summers and part-time all through college and high school. When the firm’s three-person operations team left, Matt took over and streamlined the company’s back office. His father says he made it work better than it ever had before. Still, joining his dad’s firm was never a foregone conclusion. When Matt graduated from the University of Alaska with a degree in logistics, he got an attractive offer from BP in Anchorage. About to lose one of his star employees, Doug Blattmachr went to his board. Brandon Crooks also had other options than working at his father’s company, Counsel Trust in York, Pennsylvania. After majoring in finance, Brandon went to work for Bank of America Securities. He was an investment banker working in the mortgage-backed securities business. As the mortgage market soured and Brandon was moved into the corporate side of the bank, however, he began to talk to his dad about joining him. “I think in the back of my mind, I always wanted to do that,” says Brandon. All three of the dads we talked to said that they would have hired their sons even if they hadn’t been related. The first hurdle, then, is making sure that your son or daughter is qualified. “You have to look and see whether your child is really capable of doing the work, and is he doing the work?” says Doug Blattmachr. “One of the reasons that our business relationship works is that I was qualified for the business,” says William Liles. The father-son pairs we spoke to started talking about the business at an early age, around the dinner table and after school. That easy give-and-take pays dividends when the son comes to work for the father. “We communicate with each other all day every day,” says Malcolm Liles. Different family businesses have different structures. Malcolm Liles describes himself as a ”benevolent dictator” with ultimate say over business decisions. Edward and Brandon Crooks make decisions together, along with two others on their executive committee. Whatever the management style, fathers need to make sure their children are comfortable with it before joining the business. Sons at all three companies bring their own strengths to the partnership. Matt Blattmachr understands the operations side of Alaska Trust better than anyone else. William Liles has a strong analytical bent, which he brings to bear on researching stocks, bonds, funds and wealth planning strategies. And Brandon Crooks has taken the lead on developing a directed trust business at his father’s company. Their fathers have made an effort to recognize and put their sons’ abilities to work, allowing them the flexibility to find their own particular niches within the overall company. Yet while sons and daughters may specialize, they also need to gain an overall understanding of the business so that they can take over one day. None of the fathers we spoke to were ready to retire yet, but all three had started thinking about the skills their children would need to succeed them. “I wanted to make sure that there wasn’t chaos in the event of my death or disability,” says Edward Crooks. For Malcolm Liles, the goal was to make William and himself interchangeable to clients. “I want my clients to understand that if they call and I’m out, that he can handle it,” he says. This final element of family and business succession is, perhaps, the most difficult one, and one that none of the three fathers we talked to were ready for quite yet. Still, at some point, the older generation will have to step aside, however gradually, to make way for the next one. “At my age — I’m 63 — I’m not really looking at it as a transition,” says Edward Crooks. Alaska Trust says frugal fees are better for both clients and advisors alike. New low fixed fees and advisor controlled directed trust program makes Alaska Trust a top choice for trust services. Best known as a provider of full-service managed trusts at made-to-measure prices, Alaska Trust has started turning heads for offering its directed trusts at a flat fee. Critical mass pushes outsourced approaches into the industry mainstream and big players keep lining up. The future is here, grab while you can. We’re coming up on the seventh anniversary of the Lehman Brothers crash and I can’t help but notice that the post-traumatic wounds have finally healed. Displacing $11 billion in assets creates a teachable moment for the entire industry. Creating a recovery that turns a disruptive surprise into a transformative opportunity. Life insurance is one of the least understood financial products in the world. In just a few minutes of study, one can reasonably grasp the concept of equity interests in a business , bonds and other forms of debt. Even more complicated financial products, such as derivatives and options can be readily understood. Shifting from accumulation to the distribution phase can dramatically simplify your clients’ lives. With the right technology, it can have a similar effect on an evolving wealth management operation. A few days ago the IRS quietly folded a long-standing claim that Detroit industrialist and basketball fan Bill Davidson’s heirs owed $2.9 billion on a fortune that might have been worth $3.5 billion at its peak. 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